Peter Loughran – Dearest

14. Dearest by Peter Loughran (1983)

Length: 282 pages
Genre: Horror 
Started: 23 February 2016
Finished: 25 February 2016
Where did it come from? From Paperback Swap 
How long has it been on my TBR pile? Since 19 February 2016
Why do I have it? I like horror and Peter Loughran is a new author for me.
He is a man with some fairly definitive ideas about women. The only problem is that the taxi driver’s ideas about the perfect woman are entirely too unrealistic. You see, his main trouble is that no woman – no matter how much he might love her – could ever live up to such lofty expectations. 
Deep down, the cab driver understands that some people may claim that he has some unreasonably high standards. And yes, he might possibly even agree with those people – on some level. But he also realizes that he will never lower his expectations just to suit another person’s opinion of him. After all, it’s only a matter of time until he finds the right woman; he’s sure of it.
Then he met Jacqui. She was a truly beautiful woman. Positively drop-dead gorgeous, actually. He could really see himself spending the rest of his life with such a beauty. 
And after she began carrying his unborn child, he gave her a ring in contemplation of their marriage. He knew he had to take such steps to ensure that his love was preserved and that their relationship status became permanent. After all, marriage was meant to be ‘until death do us part’ and he took such a vow to heart.
I actually thought that this story was told from a rather unique perspective, and I don’t believe that I have read anything else quite like it before. The character of the taxi driver wasn’t ever meant to be a sympathetic character – or even particularly likeable – so using him as a narrator for this story was something that I found seriously disturbing. This perspective was definitely warped, but was also chillingly effective – at least in my opinion. I give this book an A!

This was the debut novel from a new author for me. While this book was published in the early 1980s – and the horror was definitely dated because of it – I still thoroughly enjoyed reading the book. Actually, I have always enjoyed reading older horror novels. As a matter of fact, I generally think of horror novels published before 1960 as ‘Classic Horror’, and horror novels published after 1990 as ‘Modern Horror’.

A! – (90-95%)
Till we Meet Again, Glow Brightly as Moonlight
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