Tracy Michele Leininger – Alone Yet Not Alone: Based on the True Story of Barbara and Regina Leininger

84. Alone Yet Not Alone: Based on the True Story of Barbara and Regina Leininger by Tracy Michele Leininger (2001)

Length: 203 pages 
Genre: Non-Fiction 
Started: 24 December 2015
Finished: 25 December 2015

Where did it come from? From Bookmooch 
How long has it been on my TBR pile? Since 23 December 2015
Why do I have it? I like non-fiction and Tracy Michele Leininger is a new author for me.
Nestled high among the Blue Mountains of Pennsylvania, lies a lush green valley which the Native Americans have named Buffalo Valley. Very few immigrants have managed to tame the wilderness of the American frontier to settle in such a lush valley – named Penn’s Creek by the settlers – yet the handful of settlers who were successful had lived peacefully among themselves and with their Native American neighbors for many years. One such family of settlers was the Leininger family; recently arrived from Germany.

Even as the French and Indian War raged around them, the Leininger family – twenty-year-old Christian, nineteen-year-old John, fifteen-year-old Barbara, nine-year-old Regina and their parents – remained relatively safe. The autumn of 1755 had bestowed many gifts upon them – not only in terms of Nature’s rich beauty, but also in terms of a bountiful harvest. Indeed, it seemed as if the entire valley rejoiced along with the Leiningers in the fullness of the season. However, their peaceful frontier life could not last forever.

General Braddock and his army had been defeated and soon the Pennsylvania settlers would suffer the bloody effects of the French and Indian War. On October 16, 1755 – a band of Indians, led by Allegheny warriors – stormed through Buffalo Valley, burned the Leiningers’ log cabin, and captured the sisters. Few people survived the Penn’s Creek Massacre and even fewer lived to tell the story of what happened. However, Regina makes a solemn promise to her older sister just before they are unwillingly separated from each other – each to endure vastly different fates.

Barbara is taken deep into the wilderness, but continues to hold on to the hope that she will someday be reunited with her little sister. Although she is adopted into the Indian tribe, there is a longing deep inside Barbara’s soul that cannot be denied. She knows that she must escape – yet the penalty she will incur if she is caught is certain death. However, Barbara’s dream of eventual freedom only grows stronger.

What could possibly make a young fifteen-year-old woman defy all the odds and plan such an undertaking? From whom did she draw the strength? Will she ever find her sister? And if she does, will Regina remember her promise?

First of all, let me say right away that I have always enjoyed reading books with inspirational, faith-based plots and this book was no different. However having said that, for my taste, this story seemed slightly over-religious. I still enjoyed this story very much, and must say that reading about the hardships experienced by the Pennsylvania settlers was heartbreaking. I would give this book a B+!

B+! – (85-89%)

Till we Meet Again, Glow Brightly as Moonlight
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